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EU student finance for 2011/12

If you’re a European Union (EU) student and started a course before 1 September 2012 you might be able to get a loan or grant to help with tuition fees. Find out what’s available.

Check if you qualify

There are rules on who can qualify for finance. To check if you qualify, see the link ‘EU students – what student finance do you qualify for’.

The funding rules are different if you want to study a postgraduate course or study in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland - see the link ‘EU students – what student finance do you qualify for’.

EU student finance 2011/12

If you're applying for 2011/12, the basic loans and grants are:

  • full-time EU students - can apply for a Tuition Fee Loan to help with the costs of tuition
  • part-time EU students - can apply for a Fee Grant to help with the costs of tuition

What do you have to pay back?

You have to pay back any loans plus interest once you complete your course and start earning more than £15,000.

You don't have to pay back any grants, scholarships or bursaries.

Tuition fee – loans and grants

Tuition fees are the amount universities or colleges charge you each year to study.

Full-time EU students – loans

The maximum Tuition Fee Loan in 2011/12 is £3,375 a year. This is paid directly to the university or college and you have to pay it back.

Part-time EU students – grants

Part-time EU students can’t apply for a Tuition Fee Loan. Instead, they can apply for a Tuition Fee Grant. This is paid directly to the university or college and doesn’t have to be paid back.

The most you can get is £1,230 a year. The actual amount depends on things like: the ‘intensity’ of your course, your household income, if you’re single or if you have dependent children. Intensity is how long the part-time course takes to complete compared with the full-time equivalent. Ask your university or college to confirm your part-time course intensity.

Additional help – like living costs

You might be able to get help with things like your living costs if you meet certain conditions. For example, you’ve lived in the UK for more than three years before your course starts or you're a migrant worker from the EEA.

To find out about qualifying for additional support and how much you could get - see the link below.

Bursaries and scholarships

You may be able to get extra help through educational grants and charitable trusts.

  • Source Direct Gov
  • Last Updated: 06 Jan 2012